yale

Episode 19: Dornith Doherty

“I tend to think of it being about place, the landscape and the environment and how our interaction with those places affects those landscapes.”

 

Dornith Doherty is an artist whose work stimulates conversations around the world’s ever-changing ecology. A native of Houston, she obtained her BFA from Rice University and her MFA in Photography from Yale. She currently resides in Southlake, Texas and is Distinguished Research Professor at the University of North Texas, where she has been on the faculty since 1996. Dornith is a 2012 Guggenheim Fellow and has received grants from the Fulbright Foundation, the Japan Foundation, and the United States Department of the Interior, among many others. In addition, she was recognized by the Texas State Legislature as the 2016 Texas State Artist for 2D work. Doherty’s work has been exhibited extensively domestically and abroad and can be found in the permanent collections of prominent institutions such as the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Her project entitled Archiving Eden looked at the infrastructure around the preservation of the world’s plant life through the utilization of seed banks, as well as looking at the inner beauty of the seeds themselves. That work drew the attention of major media outlets and resulted in a host of artist talks around the world, including TEDx Monterey.

I recently sat down with Dornith at her current show at Holly Johnson Gallery in Dallas where we discussed growing up in Houston, the rigors of the Yale MFA, man’s impact on the environment, photographing the world seed bank vault in the arctic, backyard coyotes and the future of the banana.

Website: dornithdoherty.com

Instagram: @dornithdoherty

 

 

Episode 4: Sedrick Huckaby

Sedrick Huckaby is a Fort Worth-based artist known for his large-scale, impasto paintings that reflect his faith, his family history and his community. A native of Fort Worth, Sedrick studied art initially at Texas Weslyan before obtaining his BFA from Boston University and his MFA from Yale. He has gained notoriety nationwide for his large-scale portraits of family and community members, as well as large-scale paintings of family quilts which serve as allegory for themes of family and faith. Widely exhibited and collected, Sedrick’s work resides in the permanent collections of a variety of private and public institutions, including the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Fine Arts – Boston, SFMOMA, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Sedrick is represented in Dallas by Valley House Gallery.

I recently sat down with Sedrick at his grandmother’s former residence in Fort Worth which he has converted into an artist studio where we discussed growing up in Fort Worth, the work of Henry O. Tanner, authenticity, faith, family, heritage and “The Pit.”

Website: huckabystudios.com