fortworthart

Episode 17: Maggie Adler

“What we do as curators at museums is a form of teaching for students we may never meet”

 

Maggie Adler is Curator at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas, where she organizes exhibitions that explore the breadth of American art that exists within and outside of the museum’s collection. A native of rural New York, she received her higher education at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts where she obtained a BA in classical languages and art history and a Masters in art history. Prior to the Amon Carter, Maggie held positions at Williams College Museum of Art and the Addison Gallery of American Art at Phillips Academy, as well as a fellowship at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In addition to her curatorial duties, she also serves as co-chair for the Association for the Historians of American Art. Though her research focuses on nineteenth-century art, she is also passionate about collaborating with contemporary artists to create large-scale commissions and has worked with Jenny Holzer, Pepon Osorio, and Gabriel Dawe on site-specific installations. She is currently planning a major commission with artist Mark Dion and collaborating on a traveling exhibition pairing Winslow Homer and Frederic Remington.

I recently sat down with Maggie in the main gallery of the Amon Carter where we discussed her attraction to Williams College, her love of Winslow Homer, the color theory of Michel Eugène Chevreul, her winding career path, what makes the Amon Carter unique, and finding contemporary work that fits within the museum’s narrative.

Website: cartermuseum.org

Instagram: @theamoncarter

 

Homer’s copy of “Chevreul On Colours”

Sketch of Winslow Homer’s brother Charles from his annotated copy of “Chevreul On Colours”

Annotated pages from Winslow Homer’s copy of “Chevreul On Colours”

William Wegman speaking with high school students from Lawrence, MA at the Williams College Museum of Art (2007).

Thomas Hart Benton, Poker Night (from A Street Car Named Desire), 1948, Whitney Museum of American Art

Winslow Homer, Undertow, 1886, oil on canvas, The Clark

Frederic Remington, The Fall of the Cowboy, 1895, oil on canvas, Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Plexus No. 34 by Gabriel Dawe, site-specific installation at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Jasper Cropsey, The Narrows from Staten Island, 1868, Oil on canvas, Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Dornith Doherty in the incline gallery at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Episode 14: Nancy Lamb

Nancy Lamb is a long-admired artist that has been a fixture in the Fort Worth art and social scene for decades. A native of Fort Worth, she chose to stay close to home by studying art at Texas Christian University. Nancy first gained recognition in her hometown through a series of art classes that she taught at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History which included her production of 3D work. But Nancy is probably best known for her large-scale oil paintings of candid Fort Worth society scenes. These paintings can be found in exhibitions at home and worldwide, such as the Florence Biennale, as well as being a popular choice in private and corporate collections. Nancy is represented in Fort Worth by Artspace 111.

I recently sat down with Nancy at her home studio where we discussed growing up in Fort Worth, the disappearance of small town Texas culture, the upkeep of her four acres, going to parties, experiencing loss and what to do with thirty years of photographs.

Website: nancy-lamb.com

Instagram: @nancylamb1956

 

Episode 8: Timothy Harding

Timothy Harding is a Fort Worth-based artist who uses line, color, pattern and repetition to create depth and space in paintings, reliefs and sculptural installations. A native Texan, Timothy received his BFA from Texas Woman’s University and his MFA from Texas Christian University. He’s been the recipient of both a Nasher Sculpture Center Artist Microgrant, as well as a Kimbrough Fund Grant from the Dallas Museum of Art, where he is currently completing a residency in the museum’s Center for Creative Connections. He is represented in Dallas by Cris Worley Fine Art.

I recently sat down with Timothy at his Fort Worth studio where we discussed his residency at the Vermont Studio Center, life in college towns, grids, Xacto knives and students who wear chaps.

Website: timothyevanharding.com

Instagram: @timothy.harding

 

Episode 4: Sedrick Huckaby

Sedrick Huckaby is a Fort Worth-based artist known for his large-scale, impasto paintings that reflect his faith, his family history and his community. A native of Fort Worth, Sedrick studied art initially at Texas Weslyan before obtaining his BFA from Boston University and his MFA from Yale. He has gained notoriety nationwide for his large-scale portraits of family and community members, as well as large-scale paintings of family quilts which serve as allegory for themes of family and faith. Widely exhibited and collected, Sedrick’s work resides in the permanent collections of a variety of private and public institutions, including the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Fine Arts – Boston, SFMOMA, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Sedrick is represented in Dallas by Valley House Gallery.

I recently sat down with Sedrick at his grandmother’s former residence in Fort Worth which he has converted into an artist studio where we discussed growing up in Fort Worth, the work of Henry O. Tanner, authenticity, faith, family, heritage and “The Pit.”

Website: huckabystudios.com