Painter

Episode 22: Spencer Evans

“I wanted to find out more about my African identity outside of an American context.”

Spencer Evans is a Dallas-based artist who uses bold colors and dynamic gestures to create portraits that question the African-American identity. Originally from Houston, he earned a BFA from the University of Missouri and an MFA from the University of Texas at Arlington. Evans drew critical praise last year for his first solo show at Dallas’ Conduit Gallery entitled “I Am Because We Are”. The series was the product of research to explore the differences between Black Americans and Nigerian Africans. Examining his ancestral lineage which he traced to Nigeria and Cameroon, the artist worked with the Nigerian Baptist Theological Seminary and Bowen University to engage on-site interviews in Nigeria. The discussions focused on identity and social constructs looking for differences between Nigerians and the millions of African descendants living in the United States. In the end, Evans encountered a shift of his own point of view as he discovered many similarities between the Nigerians he met and the Black Americans he knew at home. This shift became the basis for his visual exploration of the topic.

I recently sat down with Spencer at his studio in Dallas where we discussed growing up in Houston, playing college football, understanding one’s identity, code switching and challenging preconceptions.

Website: spencerevansart.com

Instagram: @spencerevans_art

Episode 21: Benito Huerta

“We’re on the precipice of destroying ourselves. So, how do we come up with solutions to avoid that? I think we’re spurred on by the beauty that surrounds us.”

Benito Huerta is an artist, and a professor at the University of Texas at Arlington where he has been Director and Curator of The Gallery at UTA since 1997. Huerta received a B.F.A. at the University of Houston and his Masters at New Mexico State University. He was Co-founder, Executive Director and Emeritus Board Director of Art Lies, a Texas Art Journal. As a curator, he has organized surveys and retrospectives of Mel Chin, John Hernandez, Luis Jimenez, Dalton Maroney, and Celia Alvarez Munoz. As a painter, Huerta specializes in large-scale oils that utilize pop culture and historical art references to explore the juxtaposition of death and beauty. In addition to painting, Huerta also creates three-dimensional work. He has completed public works projects which include DFW International Airport, the Mexican-American Cultural Center in Austin, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, Houston Metropolitan Transit and Fort Worth’s South Main Street Public Art Project. In 2002, the Dallas Center for Contemporary Art awarded Huerta with its Legend Award. His work is included in the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Albuquerque Museum of Art, the Art Museum of South Texas and the National Museum of Mexican Art, as well a variety of private and public collections.

I recently sat down with Benito at his home studio near the UTA campus where we discussed growing up in Corpus Christi, decades in curation, beauty, death, chalupas, and booking the Rolling Stones.

To see Benito Huerta’s work on Artsy, click here.

Episode 20: Riley Holloway

“One of the greatest benefits to being independent is the relationship you have with the client…you get to be there and have a conversation of why they purchased something and why they hung it where they hung it.”

 

Riley Holloway is a Dallas-based artist whose dynamic portraits capture the faces of the world around him. A 2015 Hunting Prize finalist, he has attended The Art Institute of Dallas, the Florence Academy of Art, and the University of Texas at Arlington. In 2013, Holloway completed a unique residency at The Fairmont in Dallas, which was accompanied by a solo exhibition in the hotel’s gallery at the completion of his time there. He has been in a number of group exhibitions and repeatedly featured in solo exhibitions at Fort Works Art in Fort Worth. In addition, he completed a prominent public art mural commission for a municipal court building in downtown Fort Worth and was recently added to the Dean Collection, a contemporary art collection owned by hip hop producer Kasseem Dean (AKA Swizz Beatz) and his wife, singer-songwriter Alicia Keys.

I recently sat down with Riley at his studio in Dallas where we discussed growing up in an artistic home, studying in Florence, the impact of the right artist residency and what it’s like to have Sedrick Huckaby as your mentor.

Website: rileyholloway.com

Instagram: @hollowayfineart

 

 

  

Episode 18: Camp Bosworth

“It’s like I’m a country singer so I’m going to sing about Texas. It’s in my soul.”

 

Camp Bosworth is a Marfa-based artist who utilizes wood carving to create sculptures and paintings that reflect the world around him. Often carved and sometimes gilded in gold and silver, these pieces almost always utilize scale to create humor and interest. A native-Texan, Camp received his BFA in painting from the University of North Texas and worked in Dallas until relocating to Marfa in 2001. Camp has since become one of the de facto artists of record in the West Texas art mecca. The themes he explores range from drug cartels to boom boxes to the small-town-Texas Dairy Queen. He regularly exhibits his work throughout the Southwest, including the Webb Gallery in Waxahachie where I was recently able to sit down with Camp to discuss growing up in Texas, the influence of Claes Oldenburg, why it’s better to go big, how Marfa has evolved over the last twenty years, the oddities of interacting with busloads of tourists, giant gilded guns and steak finger baskets.

Website: campbosworth.com

Instagram: @campbosworth

 

 

Episode 14: Nancy Lamb

Nancy Lamb is a long-admired artist that has been a fixture in the Fort Worth art and social scene for decades. A native of Fort Worth, she chose to stay close to home by studying art at Texas Christian University. Nancy first gained recognition in her hometown through a series of art classes that she taught at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History which included her production of 3D work. But Nancy is probably best known for her large-scale oil paintings of candid Fort Worth society scenes. These paintings can be found in exhibitions at home and worldwide, such as the Florence Biennale, as well as being a popular choice in private and corporate collections. Nancy is represented in Fort Worth by Artspace 111.

I recently sat down with Nancy at her home studio where we discussed growing up in Fort Worth, the disappearance of small town Texas culture, the upkeep of her four acres, going to parties, experiencing loss and what to do with thirty years of photographs.

Website: nancy-lamb.com

Instagram: @nancylamb1956

 

Episode 10: Liz Trosper

Liz Trosper is a Dallas-based artist whose work utilizes assemblage and digital imaging to challenge the conventional definitions of painting. She came to painting after the prolonged study of political science and public administration, as well as professional experience in the public sector. Liz obtained her MFA at UT Dallas, a program that focuses on the intersection of traditional art theories with emerging technologies. While there, she was a resident at UTD’s highly touted CentralTrak residency program. Liz is represented by Barry Whistler Gallery in Dallas, and her work has been shown in art spaces such as The Dallas Contemporary, Lawndale Art Center in Houston, Richland College, UT Dallas, Academic Gallery in New York and many other galleries and exhibition spaces. She is a lecturer at UT Dallas and curates a nonprofit experimental art space in Dallas called Umbrella.

I recently sat down with Liz at her Deep Ellum studio where we discussed growing up in the suburbs, the landscape of community-level politics, studying philosophy, using technology in the studio, and the satisfaction of finding your life’s calling.

Website: liztrosper.com

Instagram: @lizzytrosper

 

    

    

    

    

Episode 8: Timothy Harding

Timothy Harding is a Fort Worth-based artist who uses line, color, pattern and repetition to create depth and space in paintings, reliefs and sculptural installations. A native Texan, Timothy received his BFA from Texas Woman’s University and his MFA from Texas Christian University. He’s been the recipient of both a Nasher Sculpture Center Artist Microgrant, as well as a Kimbrough Fund Grant from the Dallas Museum of Art, where he is currently completing a residency in the museum’s Center for Creative Connections. He is represented in Dallas by Cris Worley Fine Art.

I recently sat down with Timothy at his Fort Worth studio where we discussed his residency at the Vermont Studio Center, life in college towns, grids, Xacto knives and students who wear chaps.

Website: timothyevanharding.com

Instagram: @timothy.harding

 

Episode 5: Mary Vernon

Mary Vernon is a Dallas-based artist and former educator. Mary spent nearly 50 years at Southern Methodist University where she taught art history, painting and drawing, as well as SMU’s noted color theory course. Originally from New Mexico, she completed her undergraduate degree at Cal Berkeley and her MFA at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. Mary’s paintings reflect the color theories she so famously taught at SMU. One of her most recent works (“Albers’ House”) is a 36-foot-long oil painting on yupo which was featured in a retrospective at the Grace Museum in Abiliene. Mary’s work can be found in notable local collections, such as The Belo Foundation, The George W. Bush Presidential Library, Meadows Museum, Dallas Country Club, and the U.T. Southwestern Medical Center. Mary is represented in Dallas by Valley House Gallery.

I recently sat down with Mary at her Dallas studio where we discussed early inspirations, Berkeley in the ‘60s, her love of art history, the evolution of the Meadows collection, her impact on generations of art students, her love of yupo and a run-in with Georgia O’Keefe.

Website: maryvernon.com

  

   

Episode 4: Sedrick Huckaby

Sedrick Huckaby is a Fort Worth-based artist known for his large-scale, impasto paintings that reflect his faith, his family history and his community. A native of Fort Worth, Sedrick studied art initially at Texas Weslyan before obtaining his BFA from Boston University and his MFA from Yale. He has gained notoriety nationwide for his large-scale portraits of family and community members, as well as large-scale paintings of family quilts which serve as allegory for themes of family and faith. Widely exhibited and collected, Sedrick’s work resides in the permanent collections of a variety of private and public institutions, including the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Fine Arts – Boston, SFMOMA, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Sedrick is represented in Dallas by Valley House Gallery.

I recently sat down with Sedrick at his grandmother’s former residence in Fort Worth which he has converted into an artist studio where we discussed growing up in Fort Worth, the work of Henry O. Tanner, authenticity, faith, family, heritage and “The Pit.”

Website: huckabystudios.com

Episode 3: Alison Jardine

Alison Jardine is a British artist and author who lives and works in Dallas. A native of Yorkshire, Alison received an undergraduate degree from the University of London and her MFA from the University of North Texas. Her work spans a broad range of disciplines, including electronic media, sculpture and painting. Her most recent work (Objects From a Future Past) uses concrete cast in sagging, found materials to create reliefs that comment on the notion of the modern landscape. Alison has had video installations featured in Dallas’s Aurora Festival, as well as being named a Finalist for the 2016 Hunting Art Prize for Painting & Drawing. She is a Fellow of the Hambidge Center of Arts & Science, as well as the founder of the Dallas Arboretum Artist in Residence program. She is also author of the book Make Great Art on the iPad which is available through all major book retailers. Alison is represented in Dallas by Erin Cluley Gallery.

I recently sat down with Alison at her studio space within a converted cotton gin in the Deep Ellum neighborhood of Dallas where we discussed her life in the UK, her decision to become an artist, her art-making process and making room for experimentation.

Website: alisonjardine.com

Instagram: @alisonjardinestudio