Curator

Episode 21: Benito Huerta

Benito Huerta is an artist, and a professor at the University of Texas at Arlington where he has been Director and Curator of The Gallery at UTA since 1997. Huerta received a B.F.A. at the University of Houston and his Masters at New Mexico State University. He was Co-founder, Executive Director and Emeritus Board Director of Art Lies, a Texas Art Journal. As a curator, he has organized surveys and retrospectives of Mel Chin, John Hernandez, Luis Jimenez, Dalton Maroney, and Celia Alvarez Munoz. As a painter, Huerta specializes in large-scale oils that utilize pop culture and historical art references to explore the juxtaposition of death and beauty. In addition to painting, Huerta also creates three-dimensional work. He has completed public works projects which include DFW International Airport, the Mexican-American Cultural Center in Austin, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, Houston Metropolitan Transit and Fort Worth’s South Main Street Public Art Project. In 2002, the Dallas Center for Contemporary Art awarded Huerta with its Legend Award. His work is included in the Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Albuquerque Museum of Art, the Art Museum of South Texas and the National Museum of Mexican Art, as well a variety of private and public collections.

I recently sat down with Benito at his home studio near the UTA campus where we discussed growing up in Corpus Christi, decades in curation, beauty, death, chalupas, and booking the Rolling Stones.

Episode 17: Maggie Adler

“What we do as curators at museums is a form of teaching for students we may never meet”

 

Maggie Adler is Curator at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas, where she organizes exhibitions that explore the breadth of American art that exists within and outside of the museum’s collection. A native of rural New York, she received her higher education at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts where she obtained a BA in classical languages and art history and a Masters in art history. Prior to the Amon Carter, Maggie held positions at Williams College Museum of Art and the Addison Gallery of American Art at Phillips Academy, as well as a fellowship at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In addition to her curatorial duties, she also serves as co-chair for the Association for the Historians of American Art. Though her research focuses on nineteenth-century art, she is also passionate about collaborating with contemporary artists to create large-scale commissions and has worked with Jenny Holzer, Pepon Osorio, and Gabriel Dawe on site-specific installations. She is currently planning a major commission with artist Mark Dion and collaborating on a traveling exhibition pairing Winslow Homer and Frederic Remington.

I recently sat down with Maggie in the main gallery of the Amon Carter where we discussed her attraction to Williams College, her love of Winslow Homer, the color theory of Michel Eugène Chevreul, her winding career path, what makes the Amon Carter unique, and finding contemporary work that fits within the museum’s narrative.

Website: cartermuseum.org

Instagram: @theamoncarter

 

Homer’s copy of “Chevreul On Colours”

Sketch of Winslow Homer’s brother Charles from his annotated copy of “Chevreul On Colours”

Annotated pages from Winslow Homer’s copy of “Chevreul On Colours”

William Wegman speaking with high school students from Lawrence, MA at the Williams College Museum of Art (2007).

Thomas Hart Benton, Poker Night (from A Street Car Named Desire), 1948, Whitney Museum of American Art

Winslow Homer, Undertow, 1886, oil on canvas, The Clark

Frederic Remington, The Fall of the Cowboy, 1895, oil on canvas, Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Plexus No. 34 by Gabriel Dawe, site-specific installation at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Jasper Cropsey, The Narrows from Staten Island, 1868, Oil on canvas, Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Dornith Doherty in the incline gallery at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art